Part 2 of the Fantasy Book Critic Interview Is Up

Fantasy Book critic posted the second half of their interview with a dozen #SPFBO authors this morning.  Here’s a sample from one of my answers:

But the image of the concerned agent and editor, painstakingly working through draft after draft of a novel to make it the absolute best it can be, with the result being a polished gem…that seems a bit idealistic to me. There was a time when this was truer: viz., Tolkien and Allen & Unwin; Terry Brooks and Lester Del Rey. From the accounts I’ve read, an editor’s influence on a work accepted for publication at a traditional house tends to be somewhat minor these days. They’ve either read a manuscript that’s good enough to be published with only minor editing, or they’ve read a manuscript they’re passing on. The corporate culture absolutely plays a bigger role than it used to. The bottom line is of the utmost concern, in a way, I think, that would make the publishers of yesteryear blush. It’s not paranoia to say that it matters that the major publishers are all owned by large corporations. It affects their ability to take chances and develop new talent.

The influence only lessens from there: it doesn’t take a lot of research to discover that authors whose early work gets quickly remaindered don’t tend to score big future deals. It also doesn’t take a terribly keen eye to notice that the work of bestselling authors–and I’m talking the big ones, here–only gets less and less polished as time goes by. When you’ve already made millions of dollars for your publisher, your work is going to get published, even if it’s terrible. There’s a lot of successful writers out there making big money whose work would be (sometimes rightfully) deemed unpublishable by an unknown author. None of which is to say that there’s anything wrong with choosing traditional publishing. There are many legitimate reasons to do it, and at its best it still produces fine literature. I point these things out only to draw attention to the narrowing divide between the two methods. Consider the success many self published authors have had by hybridizing their work, and you see more clearly what I’m talking about.

ICYMI: here’s the first half of the interview and the short post I wrote about it.

Interviewed by Fantasy Book Critic

Mihir Wanchoo of Fantasy Book Critic interviewed me and several other SPFBO participants recently.  Click here to read part one of the interview.

Here’s a snippet:

Q] What were your expectations going into it and now that the first round is nearly over, what are your thoughts?

JC: My expectations for how well my own book would do weren’t terribly high, mostly because of what I perceived at the time as potential conflicts of taste–even after I decided that it was definitely fantasy, and that it therefore was eligible to be part of the contest, I still worried that the fact that it was in no way traditional epic fantasy (which seemed to be the bread and butter of most everyone involved) might hold it back. That aside, I was confident that anyone who read it with an open mind would enjoy the experience, and I’m very pleased with how well it’s been received, particularly for my first novel.

I’ve been absolutely thrilled to see how well it’s done: it’s one of Fantasy Faction’s top three in the first round. Even if it doesn’t move forward, I’ll always have the thrill of knowing that my novel got a good review on one of the biggest fantasy sites on the web.